1001001 SOS

10 février 2017

bitcounting

I’ve been dealing a lot with bit operations lately.  And doing lots of benchmarking, like here. As I was looking for a bit count method in Pharo (it used to be there but it no longer exists in Pharo 5.0), I got curious about the many different versions of bit counting algorithms I could find on the internet.

What’s so special about bit operations you ask?  Not much.  Except when you have to do it really fast on 64bit integers!  Like in a chess program!  Millions of times per position. So instead of copying the #bitCount method that was in Squeak, I decided I’d have a look at what is available on the net…

So I decided to share what I found.  This could potentially be useful for people who have to deal with bit counting a lot. Especially if you deal with 14 bits or less!

Here’s a typical run of the different bit counting algorithms I have tested on Squeak 5.1 64bit.

Number of [myBitCount1 (128 bits)] per second: 0.061M
Number of [myBitCount1 (14 bits)] per second: 1.417M
Number of [myBitCount1 (16 bits)] per second: 1.271M
Number of [myBitCount1 (30 bits)] per second: 0.698M
Number of [myBitCount1 (32 bits)] per second: 0.651M
Number of [myBitCount1 (60 bits)] per second: 0.362M
Number of [myBitCount1 (64 bits)] per second: 0.131M
Number of [myBitCount1 (8 bits)] per second: 2.255M
Number of [myBitCount2 (128 bits)] per second: 0.286M
Number of [myBitCount2 (14 bits)] per second: 3.623M
Number of [myBitCount2 (16 bits)] per second: 3.630M
Number of [myBitCount2 (30 bits)] per second: 2.320M
Number of [myBitCount2 (32 bits)] per second: 2.336M
Number of [myBitCount2 (60 bits)] per second: 1.415M
Number of [myBitCount2 (64 bits)] per second: 1.208M
Number of [myBitCount2 (8 bits)] per second: 4.950M
Number of [myBitCount3 (128 bits)] per second: 0.498M
Number of [myBitCount3 (14 bits)] per second: 4.556M
Number of [myBitCount3 (16 bits)] per second: 4.673M
Number of [myBitCount3 (30 bits)] per second: 3.401M
Number of [myBitCount3 (32 bits)] per second: 3.401M
Number of [myBitCount3 (60 bits)] per second: 2.130M
Number of [myBitCount3 (64 bits)] per second: 1.674M
Number of [myBitCount3 (8 bits)] per second: 4.938M
Number of [myBitCount4 (128 bits)] per second: 0.041M
Number of [myBitCount4 (14 bits)] per second: 5.333M
Number of [myBitCount4 (16 bits)] per second: 4.819M
Number of [myBitCount4 (30 bits)] per second: 2.841M
Number of [myBitCount4 (32 bits)] per second: 2.674M
Number of [myBitCount4 (60 bits)] per second: 1.499M
Number of [myBitCount4 (64 bits)] per second: 0.270M
Number of [myBitCount4 (8 bits)] per second: 7.435M
Number of [myBitCount5 (128 bits)] per second: 0.377M
Number of [myBitCount5 (14 bits)] per second: 3.937M
Number of [myBitCount5 (16 bits)] per second: 3.035M
Number of [myBitCount5 (30 bits)] per second: 2.137M
Number of [myBitCount5 (32 bits)] per second: 2.035M
Number of [myBitCount5 (60 bits)] per second: 1.386M
Number of [myBitCount5 (64 bits)] per second: 1.188M
Number of [myBitCount5 (8 bits)] per second: 4.167M
Number of [myBitCount6 (128 bits)] per second: 0.381M
Number of [myBitCount6 (14 bits)] per second: 5.195M
Number of [myBitCount6 (16 bits)] per second: 3.552M
Number of [myBitCount6 (30 bits)] per second: 2.488M
Number of [myBitCount6 (32 bits)] per second: 2.364M
Number of [myBitCount6 (60 bits)] per second: 1.555M
Number of [myBitCount6 (64 bits)] per second: 1.284M
Number of [myBitCount6 (8 bits)] per second: 5.571M
Number of [myPopCount14bit (14 bits)] per second: 18.349M
Number of [myPopCount14bit (8 bits)] per second: 18.519M
Number of [myPopCount24bit (14 bits)] per second: 7.407M
Number of [myPopCount24bit (16 bits)] per second: 7.463M
Number of [myPopCount24bit (8 bits)] per second: 7.018M
Number of [myPopCount32bit (14 bits)] per second: 4.963M
Number of [myPopCount32bit (16 bits)] per second: 5.013M
Number of [myPopCount32bit (30 bits)] per second: 4.608M
Number of [myPopCount32bit (32 bits)] per second: 4.619M
Number of [myPopCount32bit (8 bits)] per second: 4.608M
Number of [myPopCount64a (14 bits)] per second: 2.778M
Number of [myPopCount64a (16 bits)] per second: 2.793M
Number of [myPopCount64a (30 bits)] per second: 2.751M
Number of [myPopCount64a (32 bits)] per second: 2.703M
Number of [myPopCount64a (60 bits)] per second: 2.809M
Number of [myPopCount64a (64 bits)] per second: 1.385M
Number of [myPopCount64a (8 bits)] per second: 2.755M
Number of [myPopCount64b (14 bits)] per second: 3.063M
Number of [myPopCount64b (16 bits)] per second: 3.096M
Number of [myPopCount64b (30 bits)] per second: 3.106M
Number of [myPopCount64b (32 bits)] per second: 3.053M
Number of [myPopCount64b (60 bits)] per second: 3.008M
Number of [myPopCount64b (64 bits)] per second: 1.444M
Number of [myPopCount64b (8 bits)] per second: 3.091M
Number of [myPopCount64c (14 bits)] per second: 1.625M
Number of [myPopCount64c (16 bits)] per second: 1.600M
Number of [myPopCount64c (30 bits)] per second: 1.542M
Number of [myPopCount64c (32 bits)] per second: 1.529M
Number of [myPopCount64c (60 bits)] per second: 1.566M
Number of [myPopCount64c (64 bits)] per second: 1.082M
Number of [myPopCount64c (8 bits)] per second: 3.945M

Now, since method #myBitCount2 is similar to the #bitCount method in Squeak, that means there is still place for improvement as far as a faster #bitCount is needed.  Now the question is : do we optimize it for the usual usage (SmallInteger), for 64bit integer or we use an algorithm that performs relatively well in most cases?  Obviously, since I will always be working with 64bit positive integers, I have the luxury to pick a method that precisely works best in my specific case!

All test code I have used can be found here.

Note: Rush fans have probably noticed the reference in the title…


What’s new?

19 juillet 2016

What’s new?

After a major data loss (I haven’t given up on getting back all my data, mostly code repositories and databases!), I had to start all my pet projects from scratch. Luckily, it’s easier second time around as they say! And, lucky me, I store all my personal stuff on the web! So here’s a list of what’s coming up on this blog.

Ruzzle

Even though I had a decent working version of the genetic algorithm program to find the best ruzzle grid (original posts in French here, here and here), I wasn’t satisfied with the code.  It slowly evolved from a bunch of code snippets into something I could somehow call a genetic algorithm.  Problem was that my solution was tailored for this specific problem only!  Since I lost all the Smalltalk code, I redid the whole thing from scratch : better design, simpler API, more flexible framework.  I can currently solve a TSP problem, the best ruzzle grid search and a diophantine equation.

I also plan to provide examples of the 8 queens problem, the knapsack problem, a quadratic equation problem, a resource-constrained problem and a simple bit-based example with the GA framework.  Besides, the are now more selection operators, more crossover operators, more termination detectors (as well as support for sets of termination criteria!), cleaner code and the list goes on!  So I’ll soon publish a GA framework for Pharo.

As most of you know, the Rush fan in me had to pick a project name in some way related to my favorite band!  So the framework will be called Freewill, for the lyrics in the song :

Each of us
A cell of awareness
Imperfect and incomplete
Genetic blends
With uncertain ends
On a fortune hunt that’s far too fleet

Bingo

A stupid quest I’ll address after the first version of my GA framework is published.  It all started with a simple question related to the game of bingo (don’t ask!) : can we estimate the number of bingo cards sold in an event based on how many numbers it takes for each card configuration to have a winner?  So it’s just a matter of generating millions of draws and cards à la Monte Carlo and averaging how many numbers it takes for every configuration.  Why am I doing that?  Just because I’m curious!

Glorp

There’s been a lot of action on the Pharo side and Glorp.  I plan on having a serious look at the latest Glorp/Pharo combo and even participate to the development!

Sudoku

I’ll translate my articles (in French here, here and here) on the SQL sudoku solver in English and test the whole thing on the latest MySQL server.  Besides, db4free has upgraded to a new MySQL server version!

NeoCSV

I had done a port of NeoCSV to Dolphin right before losing all my code data.  Wasn’t hard to port so I’ll redo it as soon as I reinstall Dolphin!

Smalltalk

It’s time to reinstall VisualAge, VisualWorks, Squeak, ObjectStudio and Dolphin and see what’s new in each environment!  From what I saw, there’s a lot of new and interesting stuff on the web side.  Add to that the fact that most social media platforms have had significant changes in their respective APIs recently, so there’s a lot to learn there!

 

That’s a wrap folks!


Mashups

20 septembre 2015

Quelques mashups (plus ou moins réussis) impliquant Rush.

Your Love Stands Still (Rush/The Outfield)

Party in the USA / Tom Sawyer (Rush, Miley Cyrus)

The Camera Eye / YYZ (Rush, Rush mashup) !!

 


Rush en 8 bits!

9 mars 2015

Vous vous demandez comment certaines chanson de Rush sonneraient en 8 bits, comme sur une console NES ?

N’attendez plus, quelqu’un y a pensé!

Xanadu, Natural Science, Freewill, YYZ, Caravan, Hemispheres, Limelight, La Villa Strangiato, The Trees, Jacob’s Ladder, Closer To The Heart, The Spirit Of Radio, Circumstances, Subdivisions et une foule d’autres chansons!


New World Men

17 janvier 2015

Vous êtes fan de Rush?  Il y a un excellent tribute band québécois, New World Men, qui fait des spectacles un peu partout au Québec.

Deux exemples de ce qu’ils font…


Medley de Rush

13 janvier 2015

Un medley de Rush, par le groupe Sofia, assez impressionnant!

On y retrouve, dans l’ordre : The Spirit of Radio, Limelight, Subdivisions, Fly By Night, Red Barchetta, Closer To The Heart, Vital Signs, Freewill, YYZ, Circumstances, Xanadu, The Trees, 2112 (Temples of Syrinx), Tom Sawyer, La Villa Strangiato, Working Man, Anthem.


Les débuts de Neil Peart

16 août 2014

Depuis des années, la rumeur courait à l’effet qu’il existait, quelque part, un enregistrement du tout premier spectacle de Rush avec Neil Peart comme batteur.

C’est maintenant un fait et non plus une rumeur!  L’enregistrement contient même l’archi-rare « Bad Boy » !!


Resist

2 février 2013

Encore pour toi fiston, ta soeur qui drumme encore sur du Rush, Resist


Red Barchetta

2 février 2013

Pour toi fiston…  Une toune de char, de gars, de rock.  Une toune que tu risques d’adorer si tu as hérité de mes goût musicaux…  Red Barchetta, la chanson préférée de ta soeur, et la mienne aussi.

Ta petite soeur qui « drumme »